What did I learn from Malaysia, Singapore and Dubai?

So we’ve been back for a few weeks now, the kids are back at school, and whilst the weather Gods have blessed us with a relatively sunny September so far, our holiday seems yet a distant memory. Distant but solid, I would hasten to add.

I have now had the time to ponder some of the new knowledge that this year’s travel has given me, and also how it could possibly shape our travel choices in the future.

Malaysia. Land of contrasts.

What did I learn from Malaysia? A cliche that can possibly apply to 80% of the countries on earth, but it’s diversity. Had we have stayed in Johor and never visited Tioman island, we would have had such a single view of this multi-faceted country with its towering city silhouettes and dense jungle just 30 minutes down the road. Time permitting, new countries for us in the future will need to have at least two stops, and we will try to pick the most contrasting environments possible in which to stay.

The paradise that is Tioman island was somewhat marred by the lack of thought that has been given to recycling and sustainability. Whilst there is a long way to go in the UK in terms of plastic use and recycling, we are twenty years ahead of some of these places. Litter and plastic were an unfortunate reality in some of the ares that we visited in Malaysia, and I wondered what the root cause of this may have been. Apathy? Lack of understanding about environmental damage? Who knows, but seeing litter and plastic on the beach and on the jungle paths made me wonder what some of these islands and coral reefs will look like in twenty years time without intervention.

Malaysia is the 8th worse country in the world for plastic pollution. Photo courtesy of juice online.com

Singapore. Efficiency personified.

From Singapore, I learnt how antiquated our London Underground is. Their metro system is light years ahead of the tube. I did wonder how it must feel for some of these high-flying Singaporean executives to be getting on the Bakerloo line, and exiting a sweaty, squashed mess, with the smell of urine clinging on to their nostril hairs.

I also learnt that it really is a safe place to be: we stayed in the red light district and whilst a little precarious perhaps five years ago, I did not feel unsafe walking around with my family. Yes, we saw ‘business occurring’ all around us, but I think that the only downside from being in an area like this is having some choice questions from your kids. In the future though, I would do a greater level of research as to why we have procured an apartment at half the regular rate of all of the others!

Photo: visitSingapore.com

Dubai. Opinions from trodden paths.

I refer back to my previous post about Dubai, wherein I sung its praises and marvelled at how different it turned out to my expectations. The one main lesson that I learnt from here, is to let go of preconceived ideas about future visits, and to realise that every body’s view is subjective and strongly based on situational circumstances. For example, had we not stayed ‘all inclusive,’ would we have hated the high costs of wining and dining? If we had not stayed centrally, would the constantly travelling around impacted our enjoyment?

Only form opinions on the paths that we have trodden. Empty your mind of expectation and create your own memories, without the undercurrent of opinion affecting your own perceptions (I feel like this needs to end on Amen!).

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What did I learn from Malaysia, Singapore and Dubai?

So we’ve been back for a few weeks now, the kids are back at school, and whilst the weather Gods have blessed us with a relatively sunny September so far, our holiday seems yet a distant memory. Distant but solid, I would hasten to add.

I have now had the time to ponder some of the new knowledge that this year’s travel has given me, and also how it could possibly shape our travel choices in the future.

Malaysia. Land of contrasts.

What did I learn from Malaysia? A cliche that can possibly apply to 80% of the countries on earth, but it’s diversity. Had we have stayed in Johor and never visited Tioman island, we would have had such a single view of this multi-faceted country with its towering city silhouettes and dense jungle just 30 minutes down the road. Time permitting, new countries for us in the future will need to have at least two stops, and we will try to pick the most contrasting environments possible in which to stay.

The paradise that is Tioman island was somewhat marred by the lack of thought that has been given to recycling and sustainability. Whilst there is a long way to go in the UK in terms of plastic use and recycling, we are twenty years ahead of some of these places. Litter and plastic were an unfortunate reality in some of the ares that we visited in Malaysia, and I wondered what the root cause of this may have been. Apathy? Lack of understanding about environmental damage? Who knows, but seeing litter and plastic on the beach and on the jungle paths made me wonder what some of these islands and coral reefs will look like in twenty years time without intervention.

Malaysia is the 8th worse country in the world for plastic pollution. Photo courtesy of juice online.com

Singapore. Efficiency personified.

From Singapore, I learnt how antiquated our London Underground is. Their metro system is light years ahead of the tube. I did wonder how it must feel for some of these high-flying Singaporean executives to be getting on the Bakerloo line, and exiting a sweaty, squashed mess, with the smell of urine clinging on to their nostril hairs.

I also learnt that it really is a safe place to be: we stayed in the red light district and whilst a little precarious perhaps five years ago, I did not feel unsafe walking around with my family. Yes, we saw ‘business occurring’ all around us, but I think that the only downside from being in an area like this is having some choice questions from your kids. In the future though, I would do a greater level of research as to why we have procured an apartment at half the regular rate of all of the others!

Photo: visitSingapore.com

Dubai. Opinions from trodden paths.

I refer back to my previous post about Dubai, wherein I sung its praises and marvelled at how different it turned out to my expectations. The one main lesson that I learnt from here, is to let go of preconceived ideas about future visits, and to realise that every body’s view is subjective and strongly based on situational circumstances. For example, had we not stayed ‘all inclusive,’ would we have hated the high costs of wining and dining? If we had not stayed centrally, would the constantly travelling around impacted our enjoyment?

Only form opinions on the paths that we have trodden. Empty your mind of expectation and create your own memories, without the undercurrent of opinion affecting your own perceptions (I feel like this needs to end on Amen!).

Days 12-14: How Dubai far exceeded my expectations

I had a lot of preconceived ideas about Dubai, more negative than positive to be honest, based on accounts from friends and family who have either lived or holidayed here. Artificial, flashy and uber-conservative were the impressions that I had; I was wrong on many counts.

Our balcony view #nofilterneeded

Dubai literally ended up on our itinerary due to flight patterns, and us using our stopover here to visit somewhere that we have always wanted to visit (we even explored the possibilities of living here on one or two occasions). 45 degree August desert heat was clearly never going to be the ideal climate, but it did allow us to book a five star all inclusive stay at the Amwaj Rotana in Jumeirah for a fraction of the peak season cost. Everything about the hotel has been impeccable, from the view, to the service, to the food. Even the airport was the easiest to get through, with no pesky landing cards to fill out and two tourist SIM cards helpfully handed to us with our passports.

Kids and the Burj Khalifa

Dubai fully deserves its status as a luxury holiday resort. Yes, it is a man made city sprawled from the riches of its first oil discovery in 1966, but it is spectacular, and a whole lot more welcoming of its Western tourists than I thought it would be. Everybody has been extremely friendly and respectful ; they value the importance of the tourist industry (after all, the oil will run out one day) and all they ask in return is mutual respect on the part of the tourist, for example not wandering around in beach attire away from the beach and no overt displays of public affection: none of which is unreasonable.

Fountain at Dubai Mall

Dubai is what it is, and we have loved it here. From it’s crazy malls complete with swimming sharks and dancing fountains, to its pristine waters (genuinely as hot as a bath-it made Malaysia’s sea seem cold!), no expense nor effort has been spared-certainly in the areas that we have visited. Crazy hot yes- but with strategic early visits to the beach, a cooled pool and full use of air conditioning all over the place, the summer heat has been surprisingly manageable. Certainly the surprise destination of the trip; we will return.

Day 11: Singapore Zoo

I am the first to admit that zoos are not up there on my list of favourite things to do, however, Singapore Zoo repeatedly came up as a ‘must do’ as part of my research. Although our time in the country was relatively short, we decided to go the whole package and book ‘breakfast with the orangutans’ to start the day off.

It was a plentiful, mostly Western style breakfast buffet, and the Orangutans were basically brought in and given their breakfast in their area at the front of the restaurant. It did make me laugh how one tripadvisor reviewer had to put a warning in their review after being disappointed that the animals don’t actually come and sit and eat at your table with you 😂

The Zoo is excellent however, and it’s ‘open concept’ does mean that that there are no cages, often just a waist height fence and some sort of body of water between you and the animals, which did make me a little nervous when facing a Komodo dragon and a white tiger!

I did read up on the zoo’s methods of enclosure, thinking that they may use high frequency sound as a method of containment, but found no evidence of this, alongside a generally high safety record. Feeding the giraffes and elephants was a highlight for the kids; getting so close to these amazing animals was indeed a privilege and there was so much to see and learn about: I can certainly see how it consistently earns recognition as one of the top zoos in the world.

We spent around six hours there altogether, although could have easily stayed longer had the splash park area been open and if we had watched all of the six or so shows (the rainforest animals show was excellent-everything is so slick in Singapore). However, whilst the park was almost empty in the morning, from noon it got an awful lot busier (and hotter), so we welcomed the air conditioned bus with open arms as we headed off to find a late lunch.

Day 10: Pints and orchids

With only two full days to spend in Singapore, and with one of those pretty much dedicated to the zoo, we knew that we would have a busy itinerary. Our first stop was Chinatown (we mainly used the highly efficient and reasonably priced public transport system to navigate): this was a great place to wander around soaking in the atmosphere and architecture. There were lots of restaurants, market and food stalls with a friendly and vibrant feel to the place, not to mention an extreme variety of food offerings for sale (steamed chicken heads anybody?!).

Street mural in Chinatown.

Our next stop was to the famous Gardens by the Bay. Our preferred option of the two indoor garden domes (cloud forest) was closed for maintenance, so we went to the flower dome. The air conditioning alone was worth the £35 entrance fee, although to be fair it was pretty spectacular, with themed areas that included ‘Alice in Wonderland,’ and a display of orchids, the national flower. It made for an enjoyable, cool hour or so, with plenty of fun photo opportunities and not too much crowding.

Following this we had lunch at the mall food court, having battled the masses to procure a table. Having got a bowl of noodles to share, I then proceeded to try to dish them into smaller bowls for the kids. No chance, the noodles are never ending. Without a knife to be seen, the only way to go is to follow the example of the locals and to pretty much stick your face in the bowl and hoof it in.

After a bit of respite back at the flat, we went to Clarke Quay in the early evening. It was lively and buzzing, with a good array of bars and restaurants, live music, and of course that all important ‘happy hour’ -the only time when the cost of a pint was low enough to justify drinking it without guilt. How an offer of the day can be a burger and a pint for £15 I don’t quite know: unless you are earning the Singaporean Dollar, dining out can be an expensive pursuit if you eat outside of hawker centres. Nonetheless starved we have not 😂 and we managed to pack even more into one day than I though we would, I feel fairly well acquainted with Singapore now, at least from a tourist point of view.

Day 9: The city that rose like a merlion

We managed to exit Tioman Island via a five hour boat and road journey (several didn’t: the ferry is frequently overbooked and the bemused passengers left behind on the jetty were safe in the knowledge that the next ferry was not until the following day. God willing.)

Being budget conscious we had to search high and low to find accommodation larger than a postage stamp for our three nights in Singapore, and ended up with a bargain one bed apartment through Airbnb. Bargain because it’s in the middle of the red light district… The area has been cleaned up a lot over the last five years according to our cab driver, and to be honest I find it far safer than wandering around Dagenham Heathway after nightfall. At 11pm last night it was buzzing with locals, families and travellers all cramming in to what seems like hundreds of eateries (restaurants are on the odd numbered roads, brothels previously on the evens-luckily we are on 19). Owen doesn’t believe that the speciality is frog porridge-he just thinks it’s a bad dad joke lol.

We spent the evening at Marina Bay, with its classic skyline views and amazing light show ‘Spectra (we didn’t really know what the thousands were sat waiting for, so thought that we would just join them!).’ Not only was the light show stunning; but every aspect of the mall was created with no expense spared. At every opportunity Singapore wants to show us its pride in economically raising itself up from the sea like its symbolic mythical merlion.

The mall food court (hawker centre) looked delicious, however it was packed, so to the kids’ delight we ended up in the superheroes cafe, which they described as ‘epic (this word gets somewhat overused in our household). It was like a typical themed London cafe: moderate food but amazing decor.

The kids fell into bed shattered at the end of a long day, and I was not far behind them after trying to research some sort of plan for tomorrow. I went to sleep, my head spinning with images of gardens in the sky, pork noodles for breakfast and thoughts of how pricey the damn alcohol is once more…

Days 7-8: Paradise found…

I was sincerely hoping that the two hour transfer and subsequent two hour ferry ride were going to be worth the effort to get to Tioman Island (I cannot wait until the kids can properly carry their own luggage). It absolutely was. Tioman is one of the most beautiful places in the world that I have ever visited.

The view from our balcony

We are at Paya beach, one of about eight resorts dotted around the island which are all serviced via ferry. There are no cars (luggage is transported using scooters with side cars) and Paya consists of two hotel resorts and a scattering of dive operators, restaurants and duty free shops. Yesterday we went on a boat snorkel tour; the coral and the water were pristine and there were plenty of tropical fish (nothing much more exciting alas, although we did see a sea snake). The kids both enjoyed the snorkelling-Owen more than Elsie (she doesn’t like ‘big fish’ which can be somewhat problematic). I was a bit jealous of the divers-it’s been 10 years since I last went diving (never had the inclination to until now) and I would imagine some of the dive sites are pretty amazing.

I splurged and had lobster last night. It had been caught one hour prior to it being cooked, and was presented sliced in half, with a garlic butter sauce. Now I have only had lobster on a handful of occasions, but this was head and shoulders above others. We have a mixed grill preordered for tonight, so Rhodri should be in his meat heaven. We have had the more traditional noodle and rice dishes (which have obviously been great) however somewhat repetitive (maybe I have an ignorant palette): I could not envisage having a rice/noodle variation for three meals a day every day.

I will be sad to leave tomorrow, but feel recharged and relaxed after the bustle of Johor. We still have two more countries to explore with a busy itinerary (and washing to do 😂), but Tioman in particular has ensured that I will leave Malaysia with fond memories.